As Free as a Bird

Spreading my voice on the injustices of rape culture, misogyny, and human trafficking in an effort to educate others and empower like-minded women.

Archive for the tag “violence against women”

Domestic Violence Defined

Domestic Violence Defined

It is much more broad and far-reaching than many people realize.

Death is Fashionable?

Trigger warning: Violent and disturbing images

Sometimes I just want to throw my hands up in the air.

I have seen an article before about violence against women in fashion magazines and advertisements, but I looked at it as something that we are moving away from at this point. Obviously I was wrong. Here is a new Marc Jacobs ad featuring a girl who appears to be dead:

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I fail to understand why violence against women is viewed as art. I’m not sure what message they are even trying to send here. They are normalizing and glorifying violence against women, and they are using a young woman who has admitted that she is unstable to carry out that message.

I could argue that these images are actually symbolic of society and the fashion industry, and the real damage that they can cause towards women and young girls. Women are often placed on a figurative scale. As a woman, you cannot be too skinny, because then you don’t have “enough curves”, and you cannot be overweight because that makes you “disgusting”. Why do we care so much about what other people look like or what they choose to do with their bodies? It would be different if comments revolving around weight were actually born out of true concern for the person’s health, but they rarely, if ever, are. I think many people mask their ignorant comments with “concern”.

These photos are why I am honestly feeling deterred from having children. Why would I want them to grow up in world like this? Violence against women is seen as art.

Again, these are really disturbing.

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I don’t see anything artistic about this. This has very little to do with fashion, and a lot to do with violent/gore media. They look like still shots from a horror film. I guess I will never understand the fashion industry, especially when they try to make strangulation look sexy.

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I realize that there are fetishes out there, but I honestly do not think it is healthy to put on display for young girls to see. I do think we should be more open about sexual education, but I doubt Rihanna songs or fashion ads are created for education. It honestly just looks like another image of a man dominating a woman- “putting her in the place”. People seem to think all these images and jokes are harmless, but I don’t see the humor or beauty in violence. The hyper-sexualization and glorification of violence against women is a problem displayed in advertisements and the media on a constant basis. Sometimes it feels as if there is no escape from their onslaught of images. Images like these images contribute to rape culture in America. We are so desensitized to violence against women; it is almost seen as normal, and sometimes goes as far as claiming to be sexy or artistic when women are abused.

That is a serious problem. Yet, how can we change it? It is so engrained in our culture. Are we too far gone?

 

Note:

If you would like to see more images or read more on the topic, here are some sources that I used:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/copyranter/violence-against-women-in-fashion-continues-unabated

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/womens-blog/2014/jan/09/female-corpses-fashion-trend-marc-jacobs-miley-cyrus

A Note to Parents

A Note to Parents

A Challenge to Men

The Cultural Concept of Virginity

The Cultural Concept of Virginity

I’d like to hear from anyone:

What do you think about virginity? Do you think that the idea of virginity can lead to slut-shaming and victim-blaming? How so? Does it devalue women? Some people believe that the concept of virginity is an archaic belief system that encourages property ownership. Is that what it is still suggesting today?

I am not saying that I feel one way or the other, I would just like to know how you feel.

Marital Rape

Marital Rape

I just saw this on PostSecret.com.

This is a real issue that seems to get very little attention. Just because you are married does not mean you are obligated to have sex if you do not want to. If a spouse coerces you, forces you, gives you a guilt trip until you reluctantly give in, threatens you, says you do not love them unless you have sex with them, etc- it is rape and exploitation. Your body is your own, and no one owns it. Marriage is not a property right.

Combating Misogyny

Educating men and boys on the importance of women’s rights is vital to the feminist cause. So many people perceive rape and violence against women to be a woman’s issue, but those people forget who the main perpetrators are: males. If we do not reach out to the male population and gather support things may never change. There needs to be education on all of the topics and a willingness to learn amongst both genders. Instead of working against each other and promoting hate between genders, a more effective route to take would be to work together to create equality for all. We may not reach every man, but we can appeal to those who have women in their lives and let these men know that misogyny and violence against women does personally touch them. If you have a woman in your life that you care about, it touches you. Women live in a constant hyper-vigilant state in order to avoid getting assaulted. Even if a woman has never been assaulted, we all take daily routines to avoid it, whether it is a conscious effort or not. We need to reach men, because they do care, they just need to be encouraged that it is acceptable and courageous to care.

 

Speak Out Against Rape

Speak Out Against Rape

Who are you, and are you the person who will step out of their comfort zone to prevent a rape? Go with your gut, if it doesn’t feel right-say something!

Hope for the Homeless?

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This is a subject that has been on my mind quite a bit lately. I live in a fairly sizable city in Texas, so we have quite a few homeless people and panhandlers. My parents have always been drawn to those less fortunate (which is probably where I learned my passions for others). Lately my parents have been traveling out to various groups of panhandlers asking what they need. Naturally these people were surprised when someone spoke to them, as very few people engage with them other than slipping them some cash on occasion (if they’re lucky). Out of their surprised state came an outpouring of stories. I remember almost all of their stories, but one stood out in particular.

One of the women in the group under the tree that my parents spoke with confided in my mom. During their conversation my mom asked the woman where she was staying and if she had anywhere constant that she could go. The woman pulled my mom off to the side and whispered to her in a cryptic tone, “I don’t want anyone to hear me, but I live under (a tree by ____ Road). I don’t want them to hear me because sometimes when my husband leaves men will try to come around and I don’t want them to.” I instantly began to weep and asked my mom if she thought the woman had been raped or sexually assaulted before. None of us really know for sure, but it is certainly a high possibility. Even though it probably happens all the time in the homeless setting, it is something I have never really thought about- until now. Here are people that the world views as annoying, gross, or pretty much shit. Yet, they are PEOPLE; they have real problems (obviously, but people don’t seem to care or recognize that fact), real feelings, and multiple dangers. Who knows how many of these women have been raped, and I am sure that they feel like there is nothing they can do about it. Hell, I am some white bread girl, and I felt I couldn’t do anything about what happened to me. I want to research this more, because there needs to be a program for homeless women who have been sexually assaulted/exploited, or who fear sexual assault/exploitation. There may already be one, but this is just the beginning of my research. I want to talk to this woman, and other women like her. There has got to be something I can do for them. It’s terrible enough that most women in general don’t feel they can report or get help, but it is even worse when you’re living on the streets without any real resources (phone, internet, etc). There has to be a way to give them hope/help. Something to think about.

Note: Feel free to add any thoughts or ideas. I’m thinking a special rape crisis center for the homeless, or even something like free self-defense classes. I want to give the homeless some sort of hope that isn’t found in a bottle.

 

One word: Powerful

An Inspiring Video on Speaking out Against Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is bullying. If a person is causing someone else to feel negatively about themselves and helpless, it is bullying.

To the victims: speak out, and do not be silenced.

No Slut Shaming

My policy, and it should be yours, too.

My policy, and it should be yours, too

Just because someone is sexually promiscuous, even if they truly are by society’s standards or not, does not mean they are deserving of rape or open property for someone to rape. This also does not automatically make them your open target for harassment and torment. Stop the hate.

Class is in Session: Barbie and Ken 101

If you hate society and their opinions about beauty as much as I do, you will love this video.

Victim Blaming and Victim Shaming

Victim Blaming: The act of insinuating that the victim of a crime is at fault for the crime. This is seen extremely often in rape cases. The victim is blamed for their own rape. In other words, society may accuse them of wearing “suggestive clothes”, drinking “excessively or irresponsibly”, giving “suggestive eye contact”, or acting “suggestively”, claiming that the victim caused the rape to happen because of “poor decisions” or “irresponsible/slutty behavior”.

Victim Shaming: When victim blaming goes a step further. Outside of blaming a victim for the crime committed against them, people may begin to bully the victim for the crime. They may call the victim derogatory names, threaten them for coming forward, gang up on them on the internet, slander them, attack them verbally and physically, and taunt them endlessly.

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Both victim blaming and victim shaming seem to be a current trend in our society. I’m not sure if these situations are just now coming to light in the masses, or if it was always going on. Something tells me it’s been happening for a very long time.

When I was sitting in the police cruiser on the night of my attack the police were grilling me to tell them about what happened and draw up a formal charge. I told them that I did not want to press any charges, and that I just wanted to go home. They acted like they had no idea why I would not want to press charges, but I quickly enlightened them (keep in mind this was much before the Jane Doe, Rehtaeh Parsons, Amanda Todd, and other related cases came into the light). I told them that I knew what people would say of me, that they would call me a slut, say I was asking for it, and I would just be the slut in the green dress. They tried to assure me that no one would think that about me, and though I knew that what they were saying was not true, I reluctantly gave my statement and spent the longest 2 hours of my life waiting in the police cruiser.

The police pretty much shamed me for not wanting to come forward, but I think people can see why at this point in time. Jane Doe and Rehtaeh Parsons endured endless bullying from their peers and society. The process of reporting is traumatic enough without rape culture being at a height and extremely public. The police tried to convince me by saying, “Don’t you want to stop him from doing this to anyone else?” If you say anything other than yes you look like a monster, and if you say yes you are damned for life for reporting. No wonder barely any women want to report. People always like to look down on women for not reporting, but I fully understand why they do not want to.

I want to change this society, but I can’t do it alone. We all have to work together to beat it.

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Defining Ourselves

Don’t let the media and society tell you who you are- YOU show them who you are.

Killing Us Softly

I watched this series a few times throughout college. Kilbourne has 4 videos from throughout the years that discuss women, self-image, self-esteem, and violence against women in relation to how women are portrayed in the media. This is her most recent video. I believe spreading videos like this is vital to women’s physical and mental health. As she states in the video, degradation and dehumanization of women is just the beginning of violence against women.

 

Blame Misplacement

Blame Misplacement

Rape is caused by the rapist, not the victim.

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